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“Welkom” sign in Dutch trains

Contributed by bart DeRuiter on Mar 6th, 2023. Artwork published in
March 2023
.
“Welkom” sign in Dutch trains
Photo: bart DeRuiter. License: All Rights Reserved.

Sign welcoming passengers to the first class compartment in a train by the Dutch Railways (Nederlandse Spoorwegen, NS).

I wonder if this radiates first class – it’s chilly.

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  • P22 DeStijl

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3 Comments on ““Welkom” sign in Dutch trains”

  1. Dankjewel, Bart! The font in use appears to be P22 DeStijl. It’s based on a 1919 alphabet designed by Dutch artist Theo van Doesburg, cofounder of the De Stijl art movement. Signs in this style apparently were introduced by the NS in early 2016 with the new Stadler FLIRT trains, see this feature by NOS.

    The Mondriaan-themed interior design. Photo via Lanno, 2016.

    Other elements of the interior design reference the art of Van Doesburg’s fellow De Stijl member Piet Mondriaan. Bert Boermans blogged about the new sprinter design voor Uitgeverij Lambo.

    In addition to the “Welkom” signs, there are also such that read “Goede reis” (“Good trip”), see the photos taken by Tim Boric and Bearviator.

    Photo © Tim Boric, 2016

    Photo © Bearviator, 2017

    Van Doesburg’s alphabet was made into a digital font at least twice: after the P22 version by Michael Want and Richard Kegler from 1995, Freda Sack and David Quay created Architype Van Doesburg in 1997, as part of their Architypes collection. The two interpretations don’t exhibit a lot of differences. I think the version used by the NS is P22’s, based on the slightly tighter spacing. But I might be wrong.

    Comparison of P22 DeStijl (top), the sign in the NS train (middle), and Architype Van Doesburg (bottom).

  2. Thank you very much.

    The ‘welkom’ sign feels not as save as De Stijl normally does, maybe it is the cut through the O. ‘GOEDE REIS’ is much better for my eyes, more De Stijl-isch.

  3. I think the O in WELKOM is supposed to look like train doors opening and closing.

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